Winning the Battle Against Invasive Plants

This summer, our Glory Hills Conservation Lands got a lot of attention. Through hard work and dedication, and many grant funding dollars, we’re starting to see positive results of our efforts to control invasive plants at this site.

Canada goldenrod and other native plants are making a comeback at Glory Hills

Canada goldenrod and other native plants are making a comeback at Glory Hills

The variety of methods used to control plants depend on the ecological factors of each species, such as type of root system and timing of flowering, environmental factors such as proximity to wetlands or creeks, and the extent of the infestation.

A few years ago, the riparian area of the 30 acre lake at Glory Hills was covered with Canada thistle and common tansy. Today, native species in the riparian area are making a comeback, restoring the shoreline back to a healthier state.

Wild mint, Canada goldenrod, asters, birch and sedges are now found where there once was Canada thistle and common tansy so thick, it was difficult to walk. Hundreds of volunteer hours have been at the heart of this success.

We’re also pleased to have completed our internal Invasive Plants Management Plan, which we will use to help guide our future efforts in monitoring and controlling invasive plants at all our conservation sites, and guiding our habitat restoration efforts into the future.